1/14/2018

Courtesy of Fox

In an age where superhero movies dominate the box office and almost every channel or streaming service has some kind of comic book TV adaption in its lineup, it’s understandable to ask if we really need another show about superheroes.  With FOX’s new show, The Gifted, the answer to that question is a resounding yes, and I'm going to tell you exactly why.


Set in the world of 20th Century Fox’s X-Men franchise, the show revolves around the Strucker family, whose children Lauren (Natalie Alyn Lind) and Andy (Percy Hynes White) first exhibit their mutant abilities at a school dance, after Andy is bullied by other students. Unable to control their newfound powers, the ordeal leaves the school auditorium in shambles and many people injured. When the Sentinel Services government organization responsible for tracking down and apprehending mutants who unlawfully use their powers come knocking at their door, the family has to go on the run.  The interesting dynamic being that Lauren and Andys father, Reed (Stephen Moyer), used to work as a lawyer who prosecuted mutants just like them. He now seeks refuge for his family from the same Mutant Underground organization that he used to put on trial.

The show itself is not based on any particular comic book but does make use of some of the more obscure characters from X-Men lore that haven’t yet been used in the movie franchise. Members of the Mutant Underground shelter are Lorna Dane or Polaris (Emma Dumont), who yields the power of magnetism, her boyfriend Marcos Diaz or Eclipse (Sean Teale), John Proudstar aka Thunderbird (Blair Redford), who is bullet proof, and Clarice Fong aka Blink (Jamie Chung), who has the ability to create portals.
Get ready for this years X-Men: Dark Phoenix with the comic book that inspired it all

While The Gifted naturally falls short in certain categories when compared to the movies, it does a fine job working within the realm of a network TV budget to deliver a satisfying experience for viewers. With a good blend of action, drama and characterization it successfully draws the audience in from the first minute and keeps the suspense throughout the show. The effects look good enough to showcase each characters power-set and aren’t overused. The cast manages to deliver convincing performances that give the audience a good glimpse into their world and still make them relatable.  Certain tropes and clichés notwithstanding, it’s a good show that works well within its confines.  
What really stands out though is the shows ability to highlight what it means for mutants to live in world that fears and hates them. Calling back to what Stan Lee first had in mind when creating the X-Men fifty years ago, using them as a metaphor for the struggles and hardships that ethnic minorities face on a daily basis in society. And is this that sets The Gifted apart from other shows of its kind and makes it relevant, especially in today’s world. 

The Gifted is now available on Amazon.


13 comments

I'll have to check it out! I'm a big X-Men fan and so is my husband. We've been talking about checking out this show, but we just haven't yet. Thanks for reminding me. ;)

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How interesting; the time period sounds so cool for a setting of Xmen. Thanks for the background information!

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I am so addicted with the TV show The Gifted. I always make sure to watch their episodes in Fox TH every Tuesday. LOL! And every episodes makes me so out of breath with so many revelations and characters bad decision, especially now that Andy is acting shit (sorry for the word) OEMGEEE! my comment will be so long if I will talk more . LOL!

http://itsbeyondimaginations.blogspot.com/

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Yeah definitely check it out. You won't regret it :)

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Yes, and they also just announced that there will be a second season :)

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I've heard a lot of good things about this show. I need to check it out.

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Yes, it's really underrated.

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I love this show! I definitely love that this takes place in the X-Men universe but it's not about that. It's about people who are trying to get by in the world and a society that doesn't accept them. It's not about being superheroes, it's about survival and people. I've always loved the tales of the X-men for the reasons you mentioned - it's about showing minorities and their struggles and hopefully getting people to understand their struggles (subliminally of course). I also love superhero stuff as a TV show because I love long form entertainment! You just get so much more story! Also, did you notice the dad (I forget his name) is Stephen Moyer who played a vampire on True Blood, another show demonstrating a similar concept with vampires as the minority? And then his wife on this show is also from Angel, another show about vampires!

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Thanks for the great comment. Totally agree with what you said. The movies also try to touch on the minority and persecution aspect and they do so quite nicely but it can get easily lost in the excessive fights and explosions. In the comics and tv shows there's much more room to really zone in on the issue.
I knew I had seen Stephen Moyer before. But it's been a long time since I watched True Blood. The wife Amy Acker was also in Dollhouse which is another Joss Whedon show.

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Yes we love this show! A must watch!

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I watched the pilot for this show - I enjoyed. I'll have to keep watching it!

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I've been meaning to start this! Thanks for giving me the extra little nudge to get started :)

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